SUPPORT OUR WORK TO BUILD TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE

THE BATJC IS LAUNCHING OUR FIRST-EVER FUNDRAISER!!!!  We hope you will join us in our work by making a donation and/or sharing this fundraiser.

LINK TO DONATE / SHARE: http://bit.ly/2jwYQiS

[photo of three tall candles surrounded by a paper chain.]

We have been giving our all for the past 5+ years without any major funding. The last couple of years have been very exciting, as our work has grown and expanded significantly.

We are raising money to fund our 4th Transformative Justice Study. The TJ Study is a basic introduction to Transformative Justice and a chance for participants to build and deepen their knowledge. It is a series of 6 sessions led and run by our volunteer-based collective and we provide free food, childcare, supplies and space, as well as accessibility and transportation support.

The TJ study is a way for us to build more individual and collective capacity for transformative justice. This is imperative to our work; it is the foundation of how we continue to grow and share knowledge.

Our current political and social climate make it so that the most marginalized people in our communities, who are often the most vulnerable to violence, are unable to access systemic or institutional support. We believe another world is possible and we want a world where we can turn to one another for support and solutions when violence happens.

Unfortunately without money there is only so much our small collective can do! We are at an exciting turning point in our work and we want to continue growing Transformative Justice.

Please join us in this work. WE NEED YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS!

LINK TO DONATE / SHARE: http://bit.ly/2jwYQiS

In supporting us you would be helping to pay our support facilitators, provide food for participants, support participants with travel costs, restocking necessary supplies, printing materials, renting a space, and paying for child care.

Where will additional funds go?

The BATJC is currently being held by three core members, as well as anchor members (5) who support and keep the work moving forward. The collective has been focusing on doing community response support around sexual violence, facilitating TJ 101s, and hosting the TJ Study. Additionally, we have been organizing “Labs” as part of our work, a space of opportunity for community members and their support networks to come together and practice skills that will help them in practicing TJ in their everyday lives. The planning and execution of these events requires many work hours and intentionality. Any additional funds collected would go towards moving other BATJC work forward.

If you’d like to become a monthly donor please contact us.

We are also available to receive funds through
VenMo@BayAreaTransformativeJustice-Collective.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!!​! ❤

[photo of a large piece paper from our BATJC TJ Study Dream Line with participants’ dreams for 20+ years written with different colorful markers. Some examples that can be read are, “all elders are cared for and valued. no one ever has to fear being abandoned by their community because of age or disability,” “TJ accountability processes/interventions are common place,” “prisons begin to sit empty because they are less and less utilized,” “my children as adults have a community to turn to and support each other in building an environmentally just and violent-free world,” “we have abolished the sex offender registry for good.”]

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BATJC TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE LAB: COMMUNICATION SKILLS BUILDING

UPDATE: REGISTRATION FOR THIS LAB IS NOW FULL. Thank you for the overwhelming response we have gotten for this Lab! We have reached our limit on participants. If space opens up, we will let you all know.

************************

TJ LAB COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS

BATJC TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE LAB: COMMUNICATION SKILLS BUILDING 

November 18, 2017 from 1pm – 5pm

Organized by the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective**

 

Click here to visit the Facebook event page

 

PLEASE REGISTER HERE FOR THE LAB, as space is limited. 

We strongly encourage participants to attend with someone(s) from their pod*. This is a great opportunity to engage with the folks in your pod about TJ.

 

The BATJC Lab is open to the public with a suggested donation of $5 – $40. No one turned away for lack of funds. All funds go directly to support the BATJC.

There will be free snacks and childcare provided (please see information below).

Please review the BATJC’s shared values, principles and practices before you attend. We orient all of our work (including events) from these. 

We welcome questions, please contact batjcinfo@gmail.com.

 

Please help us support a SCENT/FRAGRANCE FREE SPACE by attending chemical and fragrance free. For more information, please check out the accessibility section below.

 

_____ DESCRIPTION ________________________________________________________________________

Join the BATJC for our second Transformative Justice Lab! The TJ Labs are a new part of our work and we are excited to collectively grow them together. We hope it will be a space to allow people to practice and build transformative justice in the Bay Area with the people in their everyday lives.

 

COMMUNICATION SKILLS BUILDING TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE LAB DESCRIPTION:

This TJ Lab will be a skillshare on communication skills. Rarely do we intentionally practice our communication skills, even though we know that skilled communication is fundamental to any kind of TJ work we engage in: from survivor support, to accountability support, to effective de-escalation, to pod work, to general TJ processes. This 4-hour Lab will be a hands-on practice space for participants to explore, develop and use basic skills such as active listening and accountable sharing through interactive exercises about communication. We will cover why skilled communication is important, introduce different tools for folks to use, as well as frame how they can be used within interventions.

 

FACILITATOR: This Lab will be facilitated by Mia Mingus. She has been engaged in TJ work for more than a decade at both the local and national level, specifically focusing on intimate and sexual violence, especially child sexual abuse. Read more about Mia here.

 

_____ LOGISTICS _______________________________________________________________________________

 

WHEN: November 18, 2017 from 1pm – 5pm

 

WHERE: The BATJC TJ Lab will take place at Little Pilgrims’ Preschool and Daycare, 3900 35th Ave, Oakland, CA 94619. Please use the entrance on Magee Ave.

 

ACCESS:

  • The space for the Lab is wheelchair accessible with gender neutral and wheelchair accessible bathrooms, as well as access to outside space and picnic tables.
  • The entire Lab will take place primarily in one large room, with bathrooms off to the side.
  • Please help us support a fragrance free space, by attending chemical and fragrance free. For more information, please check out: https://eastbaymeditation.org/resources/fragrance-free-at-ebmc/.
  • We have 2 folks who are supporting with accessibility needs. Please let us know in your registration what you might need, including if you’d like to communicate directly about your needs.
  • There may also be helpful information in the SELF/GROUP CARE section below.

 

PARKING: There is free onsite parking in the parking lot behind the church, accessible from Magee Ave.

 

BART AND BUS:

  • From Fruitvale BART station: Take the 54 bus heading toward “Campus Dr & Merritt College”(East). Get off at the California St. stop (past MacArthur BLVD), the Lab will be located less than a block up. The stop for the return bus to Fruitvale Station (54 West) is located across the street on the corner of Arizona St. and 35th Ave.  
  • From Downtown OaklandTake BART to 19th Street Oakland (@Thomas L. Berkley Way and Broadway). From there take the NL bus heading toward “Eastmont Transit Center.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.
  • From the MacArthur BART station: Take the 57 bus heading toward “Foothill Square.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.
  • From South BerkeleyTake the 12 bus heading to Lakeshore. Walk to MacArthur Blvd. & Lakeshore Ave. Take the NL bus heading toward “Eastmont Transit Ctr.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.

 

CARPOOL: Please indicate on the registration form if you can offer a ride, or if you need a ride to the Lab. We will coordinate carpooling. The deadline for carpool coordination is 48 hours before the skillshare (by 1pm on  Nov. 16th). If you miss the 48 hour deadline you’re welcome to coordinate carpool for yourself on the  facebook event page.

 

FOOD: We will have snacks and tea to enjoy while participating in the TJ Lab. If you have dietary restrictions and/or would like to contribute some snacks, please note them on the Google form registration.

 

CHILD CARE: The BATJC will provide free childcare during the Lab. We actively support the participation of people with children in this work. Some content may not be appropriate for young children, thus childcare will be provided in a separate room on site. If you’d like to use this service during the event, please go to the registration form to share some more information with us! The deadline for requesting child care is November 9th, one week before the skillshare.

 

SELF/GROUP CARE: For this Lab, we will not be talking in-depth about violence/abuse, though we may refer to different examples of violence in the context of TJ and communication. This Lab will be focused on practicing communication skills unlike our previous Lab, where we used case studies together. Because of this, we will not have a designated onsite emotional support team at this Lab, though we will have many skilled support people in the room, if needed.

 

As always, with every space we hold: We encourage all attendees to take care of themselves before, during and after this event. Caring for ourselves and others is important in this work, please take some time to think for yourself about what you might need in this space!

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________

 

*For more info on Pods: https://batjc.wordpress.com/pods-and-pod-mapping-worksheet/

** The Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective (BATJC) works to build and support transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse (https://batjc.wordpress.com/).

Prelude to Transformation

Prelude to Transformation

By Sean Norris

While both learning and doing Transformative Justice work there have been many eye opening moments, maybe none more eye opening than this realization: We will not live to see the change we are building toward.

I am in no way saying that this is some revelatory assertion, or that Martin Luther King Jr. never said “I might not get there with you,” but as someone new to organizing, this felt very important for me to ground in as soon as possible.

This is the somber, sobering reality of radical work; it is also one to the most liberating aspects. This truth connects us to all of those who came before us who spent their lives in service of freedom. It connects us to all of those that did not live to see the change they fought hard to set the stage for, that they diligently devoted so much of their being to. From Grace Lee Bogs, to Martin Luther King Jr., to Sojourner Truth, to Cesar Chavez, to Audre Lorde, and to the countless agents of liberation that have gone unrecorded and unacknowledged, yet have had an immeasurable impact on us being here in this moment that we are. None of them lived to see what they envisioned and labored for come to fruition.

And neither will we.

Liberation is too big a task for any one individual, or collective, or organization, or governing body. Liberation is too big a task for any one generation. As much as we rely on our ancestors for education and guidance, we must rely on those who come after us, our descendants, to not only take care of us, but to take care of our work.

This is generational work. This is something we leave behind for our descendants to continue. This is decentralized, collaborative work. This is something we hand off to as many people as we can so that they can build and grow it with, or without us.

This does not mean that we do not do the work, this means that we approach it in a different way. We do not approach it with the pressure of having to solve CSA in our lifetime, to abolish prisons in our lifetime; those issues are much too big to conceive solutions for in one lifetime. However, when we think of the strength, knowledge, and wisdom of those who have come before us and those that will come after us, when we set a better stage, set our sights on moving things forward for our descendants, the work gets a lot lighter and a lot more manageable.

In our collective, we make sure we leave space for visioning. The more I do this work, the more I realize just how important visioning is, and how cut off we are from it in our myopic day to day lives.  We vision across lengths of time ranging from one year from now to fifty years from now; we experience what it is to imagine something that you will never see, but move towards it any way. Engaging in that type of visioning makes you realize how important it is to, not only develop your own leadership, but grow the leadership of others; we begin to understand that everyone needs to take ownership and leadership of TJ, or it will not be sustainable. If and when we die, this thing, our movements, our ideals can’t die with us, or become inert, aloof, or content because of what one individual accomplished in their lifetime.

In the workforce (as far as my understanding being socialized in a capitalist country), you set short term and long term goals, or deadlines, or benchmarks, or what have you, you work toward those until a project or task is either complete or abandoned because the goal cannot be accomplished, then you move on to your next goal and the cycle repeats.  We are afraid to start projects we cannot finish, we consider that failure in our professional lives; Transformative Justice requires that you begin something that you cannot finish, as well as redefine success and failure in the process. Did you make sure that one child was a little safer, that immediate harm stopped, even if you did not address all the systemic factors that caused the violence and transform a community? Did you make sure that someone going through abuse had a respite, that they had a meal, helped them find housing or a job, even if you did nothing to address their abuser?  Did you get someone to connect to the conditions (i.e. alcoholism, internalized oppression, patriarchal modeling, etc…) that cause them to act in unaccountable and or abusive ways in their communities and interpersonal lives so that they can do their own accountability/healing work? These are all ways of pushing TJ forward, these are all ways to take care of and build community. These things are the foundation of Transformative Justice, that get us thinking about being accountable for ourselves and those around us.
We are in the prelude of the long story of liberation, and as with any great work of art, the prelude is just as important as the body; the prelude sets the stage for everything to come.

EVENT: Transformative Justice Lab – March 4, 2017

labs-flyer

 

BATJC TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE LAB
March 4th, 2017 from 12pm – 4pm
Organized by the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective*

This event is being organized in conjunction with the BATJC Transformative Justice and Pods 101 on January 28, 2017 from 1pm-3:30pm. We are encouraging those who would like to attend the Lab and are not familiar with transformative justice (TJ) or “pods” to attend the TJ and Pods Teach-In. The 101 is also a great opportunity to invite people in your pods to learn about TJ.

TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE LAB DESCRIPTION:
Join the BATJC for our first Transformative Justice Lab! The TJ Labs are a new part of our work and we are excited to collectively grow them together. We hope it will be a space to allow people to practice and build transformative justice in the Bay Area with the people in their everyday lives.  

What are The BATJC TJ Labs?
The TJ Labs are a place to collectively workshop and practice our skills for transformative justice. The Labs are for people and their pods who are trying to practice TJ in their lives. The Labs will be a self-organized community space where people can come together and work on different parts of transformative justice. All participants are encouraged to self-organize TJ-related groups based on their needs and interests. There will be BATJC folks on-hand to help support different groups, if needed.

Groups that have already been organized and confirmed are listed below and participants are welcome to join them (please note in your registration). Though the BATJC focuses on child sexual abuse, the Labs will be a place to address all forms of violence. Below are some examples of groups and work that will be available:

Response Support Groups: Brainstorm and support TJ responses to current situations of violence, abuse or harm for participants who have specific situations they are facing in their lives. This is both for people who are experiencing harm, as well as for those who would like practice in supporting others in responding to harm. There will be people in the room who have been involved in this work who can help support and we hope this can be a place for new folks to learn. In providing a space to address violence, harm and abuse, we strongly encourage all participants to bring people they trust with them to the Lab.

Case Studies: The BATJC will have different scenarios/case studies on-hand for those who would like to practice thinking through response support. This is a great place to practice response support with folks from your pod.  

Pod Work: The Labs are a good place to meet with your pod and tackle any number of things such as: having conversations with them about transformative justice; doing work around your shared values; talking about accountability; setting up safety plans; working on a case study together (mentioned above).

Pod Building Support: There will be a group specifically designated for those who would like to gain support on how to build their pods.

Accountability Support for People Who Have Harmed: BATJC members will support a group of people who specifically are currently working on being accountable or have been seeking to be accountable for harm they’ve caused. The Labs will help provide a space to process through incidents of harm and/or violence. However we especially ask of people who have harmed to plan to practice self-care before, during and after the labs.

Parents and People Raising Children: For those who would like to meet together to support one another in preventing and/or responding to child sexual abuse as parents and people who are raising children.

Educator and Youth Workers: For educators and youth workers who are interested in transformative justice.

 

This event is open to the public with a suggested donation of $5 – $40. No one turned away for lack of funds. All funds go directly to support the BATJC.

There will be free food and childcare provided (please see information below).

 

PLEASE REGISTER HERE FOR THE LAB so that we may plan accordingly and please review the BATJC’s shared values, principles and practices before you attend.

For questions, please contact batjcinfo@gmail.com.

WHEN: March 4th, 2017 from 12pm – 4pm

WHERE: The BATJC TJ Lab will take place at Little Pilgrims’ Preschool and Daycare, 3900 35th Ave, Oakland, CA 94619. Please use the entrance on Magee Ave.

PARKING: There is free onsite parking in the parking lot behind the church, accessible from Magee Ave.

BART AND BUS:

From Fruitvale BART station: Take the 54 bus heading toward “Campus Dr & Merritt College”(East). Get off at the California St. stop (past MacArthur BLVD), the Lab will be located less than a block up. The stop for the return bus to Fruitvale Station (54 West) is located across the street on the corner of Arizona St. and 35th Ave.  

From Downtown Oakland: Take BART to 19th Street Oakland (@Thomas L. Berkley Way and Broadway). From there take the NL bus heading toward “Eastmont Transit Center.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.

From the MacArthur BART station: Take the 57 bus heading toward “Foothill Square.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.

From South Berkeley: Take the 12 bus heading to Lakeshore. Walk to MacArthur Blvd. & Lakeshore Ave. Take the NL bus heading toward “Eastmont Transit Ctr.” Get off at 35th Avenue and MacArthur Blvd, about four blocks from the Lab.

 

CARPOOL: Please indicate on the registration form if you can offer a ride, or if you need a ride to the Lab. We will coordinate carpooling

FOOD: We would like to make sure to have food and beverages for everyone to enjoy and will be providing a variety of dishes. In order to make sure everyone is well fed and we meet strict dietary needs and food allergies, we would appreciate volunteers who would like to bring a dish, beverages or snacks to share. Please indicate on the registration form if you would like to contribute food, beverages or snacks.

ACCESS: The space for the Lab is wheelchair accessible with gender neutral and wheelchair accessible bathrooms and has access to outside space and picnic tables. Please help us support a fragrance free space, by attending chemical and fragrance free. This will also help support the children who use the daycare space we are in.

CHILD CARE: The BATJC will provide free childcare during the Lab. We actively support the participation of people with children in this work. Because some content may not be appropriate for young children, childcare will be provided in a separate room on site. If you’d like to use this service during the event, please go to the registration form to share some more information with us!

SELF/GROUP CARE: We encourage all attendees to take care of themselves before, during and after this event. Caring for ourselves and others is important in this work and we want to make sure everyone takes some time to think about what they might need. We will be talking about violence/abuse and it may bring up unexpected things for you. Below are some suggestions that may be useful, especially if you think some of the content may be triggering for you:

– Attend the event with a friend and/or support person. Or have at least one person who knows you will be attending this event that you can reach out to if you need support.

– Think about what might be best for you before, during and after this event. Some examples might be: Planning to do things that bring you resilience, joy, reflection or nourishment.  Planning down time or to be around people who support you in taking care of yourself. Bringing a meaningful object with you that will help ground/comfort you during the event  (something you can wear, hold in your hand and/or look at are often helpful).

*The Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective (BATJC) works to build and support transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse. The BATJC orients all of our work, including events, from our shared values, principles and practices.

If you would like to know about future BATJC events, please join our BATJC Community list, a  low-volume list that is only used to announce BATJC events and work. You can also follow our BATJC Page

EVENT: Transformative Justice and Pods 101 – January 28, 2017

tj-101
TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE AND PODS 101
January 28, 2017 from 1pm-3:30pm
Organized by the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective*

This event is open to the public and is being organized in conjunction with the BATJC Transformative Justice Lab which will take place on March 4th from 12pm-4pm. We are encouraging those who would like to attend the Lab and are not familiar with transformative justice (TJ) or “pods” to attend the TJ and Pods 101. This is also a great opportunity to invite people in your pods to learn about TJ.

TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE AND PODS 101 DESCRIPTION:
How do we respond to violence within our own communities without relying on the police or other state systems? This 101 will offer a basic introduction to and overview of the core concepts of transformative justice. It will be a space for participants to learn about TJ and how to begin thinking about community-based responses to violence. We will also cover the concept of “pods” from the BATJC. This will be an educational event with a Q&A.

This 101 will be given by Mia Mingus. Mia Mingus is a writer, public speaker, community educator and organizer working for disability justice and transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse. Mia is currently running The Living Bridges Project, an anonymous story-collecting project documenting collective responses to child sexual abuse. She is a member of the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective (BATJC), a local collective working to build and support transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse.

This event is open to the public with a sliding scale of $5 – $40. No one turned away for lack of funds. All funds go directly to support the BATJC. There will be free food and childcare provided (please see information below).

PLEASE RSVP HERE for the TJ and Pods 101.   

For questions, please contact batjcinfo@gmail.com.

WHEN: January 28, 2017 from 1pm-3:30pm

WHERE: Fuller Hall, Downs Memorial United Methodist Church, 6026 Idaho St., Oakland 94608 (please use the parking lot entrance)

PARKING: The church has a large parking lot behind it and lots of street parking around it.

BART AND BUS:  The nearest bart station is Ashby BART, one mile away (here is a map). The closest bus stations are #12 and the F, and the 72M/72R/77 and 88 bus lines are about a 10 minute walk.

CARPOOL: Please indicate on the RSVP form if you can offer a ride, or if you need a ride to the Lab. We will coordinate carpooling.

FOOD:  We would like to provide food and beverages for everyone to enjoy.  We would appreciate volunteers who would like to bring a dish, beverages or snacks to share. We hope to meet the strict dietary needs and be mindful of food allergies. Please indicate on the RSVP form if you would like to contribute food, beverages or snacks.

ACCESS: The space is wheelchair accessible (including bathrooms) and there are several disabled spaces in the parking lot, near the accessible entrance. Please attend fragrance free to support folks with chemical sensitivities. If you have other access needs, please note them in the RSVP form.

CHILD CARE: The BATJC will provide free childcare during the event. We actively support the participation of people with children in this work. Because some content may not be appropriate for young children, childcare will be provided in a separate room on site. If you need on-site childcare during the event, please go to the RSVP form to share some more information with us!  

SELF/GROUP CARE: We encourage all attendees to take care of themselves before, during and after this event. Caring for ourselves and others is important in this work and we want to make sure everyone takes some time to think about what they might need. We will be talking about violence/abuse and it may bring up unexpected things for you. Below are some suggestions that may be useful, especially if you think some of the content may be triggering for you:

– Attend the event with a friend and/or support person. Or have at least one person in your life that you can reach out to if you need support.

– Think about what might be best for you before, during and after this event. Some examples might be: Planning to do things that bring you resilience, joy, reflection or nourishment. Planning down time or to be around people who support you in taking care of yourself. Bringing a meaningful object with you that will help ground/comfort you during the event (something you can wear, hold in your hand and/or look at may be helpful).

*The Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective (BATJC) works to build and support transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse. The BATJC orients all of our work, including events, from our shared values, principles and practices.

If you would like to know about future BATJC events, please join our BATJC Community list, a very low-volume list that is only used to announce BATJC events and work or follow our BATJC Page.

Challenging Toxic Cultural Norms: Shifting From Solely Thinking and Adding Feelings

Challenging Toxic Cultural Norms: Shifting from solely thinking and adding feelings.
By Layel Camargo

As a culture shifter from punishment to accountability, I have become familiar to some cultural norms that make it almost impossible for individuals to transform their harmful behavior. I have been consciously and intentionally supporting the practice of accountability for a humble 3 years now, which has mainly been through my involvement with the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective. Through this work I’ve been approached by bystanders, survivors and people who have harmed alike.

In politically engaged communities, when supporting people who have caused harm, it has become clear to me that we are unequipped to respond to incidents of harm and violence in our liberatory organizing spaces/communities. Regardless of how politicized our communities are we simply fall short in one way or another at how we respond to these incidents. I have yet to understand the totality of why our movements have shortcomings at responding to incidents of violence and harm. However, I strongly believe that there are cultural norms established by imperialistic, colonial and capitalistic ideals that have seeped there way into our movements and contribute to these shortcomings.

what do we do when intimate partner violence exists in our collectives? what do we do when community organizers verbally abuse each other? what happens when the people we march the streets with, hurt the people we are fighting for? how do we continue our liberatory work when our comrades abuse and harm each other?

Imagining and feeling the responses to questions like these will help us understand not the specifics of how to respond but what cultural norms exist in our movements that hinder the possibility of creative and innovative responses outside of the prison industrial complex. This is where I believe our liberatory work needs to move. When talking to folks who are seeking to be accountable in their communities the narrative is more often than not the same, “I tried to find support in my community but …” followed by some explanation of how they were ignored/there wasn’t capacity for them to be accountable or told to literally or figuratively leave the community.

Being accountable for harm or violence does not require a collective of people to respond but responding alone is neither radical nor new. This is why it pains me to accept that in our movements, we struggle to foster relationships that will show up for each other when we are seeking to be accountable or need support when we are victimized. For example, as a college student I was in an abusive intimate relationship that escalated to physical violence that was visible to our community members and comrades. Even though, my ex and I met in an organizing space and at the time were seen as leaders in our community, at the time I struggled to find one person who could validate the ways I was victimized. If finding validation was difficult for me I doubt my ex had space to process and transform her behavior. How does this dismissal of violence happen? What are the unspoken cultural norms that we have accepted in our movements that make ignoring violence so prevalent?

Unfortunately, in our fast paced world the opportunity to practice compassion and humanity feels unaccessible and overwhelming, and our liberatory work is not exempt from that fast pace of life. This is one of the reasons why we rely heavily on fast thinking and less feeling, it’s what keeps us moving forward. And even though our radical communities are politicized we have allowed what I have come to call, toxic cultural norms to saturate the foundation of our movements. These toxic cultural norms such as individualism, professionalism, disposability, fear of scarcity, binary thinking, competition, criminalization, othering and many more, do not allow us to be creative or innovative in responding to violence and harm within our movement/liberatory work. Thus perpetuating the lack of practice for compassion and humanity and in my experience we don’t respond any better because we’re politicized, we respond better when we hold compassion and humanity during incidents of violence and harm. This is one of the biggest struggles of my work as a culture shifter and this is our work as movers and shakers against the prison industrial complex.

In no way am I saying that we must stop the encouragement of analysis or fast thinking, because it is this practice that has liberated many of us and interrupted the generational imperialistic, colonial and capitalistic brainwashing. However I do want to emphasize that the ideals of such oppressive systems are not only ideals but are cultural norms that we have accepted and negotiate constantly. The reliance on analysis and fast thinking alone will not liberate us and will not dismantle toxic cultural norms that harm us and perpetuate violence. It’s the allowance and permission we give each other to feel the pain, grief, sorrow, joy, confusion, guilt and many more of emotions that occur at our most difficult of times.

It is especially important that during difficult times it’s important to ask questions like: Why do I feel like I have to face my problems alone? Why do I want to cover up my actions when I hurt someone else? Why can’t I accept that I hurt someone as much as they hurt me? Who am I if I am harmed and have harmed? I think that in order for us to strengthen our movements we must begin to look at the cultural norms we have unconsciously accepted that limit our ability, time and space to feel.

EVENT 10/5 – Beyond the Registry: How Youth Registration Undermines Healing and Justice

Join the BATJC for an event with Nicole Pittman!

EVENT:  Beyond the Registry: How Youth Registration Undermines Healing and Justice

WHEN: October 5, 2016 at 6:30pm

WHERE: Fuller Hall, Downs Memorial United Methodist Church, 6026 Idaho St., Oakland 94608 

This event is free and open to the public, please RSVP HERE

Nicole will share about her work on youth registration and child-on-child sexual harm. If you haven’t heard of Nicole’s work, you can check-out a recent article from The New Yorker as well as Raised on the Registry.

Beyond the Registry: How Youth Registration Undermines Healing and Justice

It’s tempting, especially in sexual harm situations involving children, to cast a perpetrator and a victim; but this false binary fails to capture a complete story and contributes to punitive state responses that instead of disrupting cycles of trauma only cause more damage. Forty states include children — some as young as 8 years old — on sex-offense registries, labeling them for decades or life. In this discussion, we will explore the destructive impact of placing children on sex-offense registries as well as how to evolve beyond flawed conceptions of child-on-child sexual harm and toward transformative responses that can prevent further suffering.

This event aims to:

– Understand the current legal responses to child-on-child sexual harm in California and nationwide, and the impact of registration on children, survivors and families

– Discuss flawed narratives about registries and youth who cause sexual harm along with strategies for disrupting those narratives

– Brainstorm alternative responses to support survivors, those who have harmed, and their families

Nicole Pittman: Director, Center on Youth Registration Reform at Impact Justice  (@NicoleNPittman)

Nicole Pittman founded the Center on Youth Registration Reform at Impact Justice, an organization dedicated to eliminating the widespread practice of placing kids on sex-offense registries. A Stoneleigh and Rosenberg Leading Edge Fund fellow (and 2011 Senior Soros Justice Advocacy fellow), Pittman, began documenting the harms of labeling young people more than a decade ago as a juvenile public defender. She later collected more than 500 stories for a Human Rights Watch report titled Raised on the Registry. Ending youth registration is part of a larger desire to change the narrative around child sexual behavior, which will ultimately allow the country to move beyond punitive responses and toward lasting child sexual abuse prevention and healing.

PARKING: The church has a large parking lot and lots of street parking as well.

BART AND BUS:  The nearest bart station is Ashby BART, one mile away (here is a map). The closest bus stations are #12 and the F, and the 72M/72R/77 and 88 bus lines are about a 10 minute walk.

ACCESSIBILITY: The space is wheelchair accessible (including bathrooms) and there are several disabled spaces in the parking lot, where the accessible entrance is. Please refrain from wearing perfume/scents to support folks with chemical sensitivitiesIf you have other access needs, please note them in the RSVP form.

CHILDCARE: Due to the content of this event (i.e. child sexual abuse, sex offender registry and child-on-child sexual harm), there will be no childcare.

SELF/GROUP CARE: We encourage all attendees to take care of themselves before, during and after this event. Caring for ourselves and others is important in this work and we want to make sure everyone takes some time to think about what they might need. We will be talking about violence/abuse and it may bring up unexpected things for you. Below are some suggestions that may be useful, especially if you think some of the content may be triggering for you:

– Attend the event with a friend and/or support person. Or have at least one person who knows you will be attending this event that you can reach out to if you need support. 

– Think about what might be best for you before, during and after this event. Some examples might be: Planning to do things that bring you resilience, joy, reflection or nourishment.  Planning down time or to be around people who support you in taking care of yourself. Bringing a meaningful object with you that will help ground/comfort you during the event  (something you can wear, hold in your hand and/or look at are often helpful).

Hope to see you there! Please share and help us spread the word!